wsj.com/amp/articles/the-biggest-problem-with-flying-cars-is-on-the-ground-11652500850
Electric, vertical take-off-and-landing passenger vehicles promise to make George Jetson’s commute a reality. Hundreds of companies, new ones and legacy aviation players alike, are working on such vehicles. Flying cars will be part of future cities’ transportation infrastructure—as long as they can find places to land.

Hundreds of companies, new ones and legacy aviation players alike, are working on such vehicles. Five such startups have gone public in the past 12 months. They are trying to shape a near future in which taking a flying cab is an economically viable alternative to taking a terrestrial one.

Flying-car companies haven't figured out how to site, permit and construct enough places for their vehicles to land and take off. The problem could have huge implications for the nascent flying-car industry, and for any hope that we will be commuting by air anytime soon. The biggest stumbling block to that sci-fi vision, though, is rather down-to-earth.

Early entrants to the industry, such as Joby Aviation, Lilium, Wisk, Airbus and Archer Aviation, have focused on the challenges of designing and building flying cars that work. Those challenges are considerable, including getting them certified as safe by the Federal Aviation Administration.
Posted by DI dickenskale
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