nextavenue.org/how-george-carlin-used-his-words
Judd Apatow, director of a new HBO documentary on George Carlin, talks about the late legendary comic. Growing up in the sixties, Sunday nights at 8 p.m. on CBS was appointment viewing. "The Ed Sullivan Show" had introduced American audiences to the Beatles in 1964.

"George Carlin's American Dream" is a two-part documentary streaming on HBO Max. Stephen Colbert declares Carlin "the Beatles of comedy" The documentary follows the comedian's professional and personal ups and downs over his 50-year career. "He also had a lot of really dirty material where [he] discussed filthy things," Colbert says.

Apatow has been interviewing comics since his days on his high school radio station. Apatow's latest collection of interviews with comedians is "Sicker In the Head" "My family loved comedy. My grandmother was very close to (comedian) Totie Fields," he says.

In his 1972 album "Class Clown," he talked about everything I was going through. And I think that Carlin was probably the most impactful. He liked to call out authority and attack hypocrisies. He also had a lot of really dirty material where [he] discussed filthy things.
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